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  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110650
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The percentage of the Canadian population attending religious services on a regular basis has declined over the past 20 years. According to the General Social Survey (GSS), 21% of Canadians aged 15 and over reported they attended a religious service at least once a week in 2005, down from 30% in 1985.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200800210622
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Fishing or angling has historically been a popular leisure activity for both Canadians and visitors alike. This article provides a portrait of recreational fishing in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-06-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810413208
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Throughout much of the last century, older couples faced only one retirement decision -- the husband's. However, the dramatic rise and sustained participation of women in the paid labour force since the 1970s transformed the retirement transitions of married couples; increasingly, couples had to make two decisions and balance the preferences and constraints of partners who both made substantial contributions to household income. This article looks at the extent to which spouses synchronize the timing of their retirements, the factors associated with taking one or another pathway into retirement and changes in patterns of retirement through the 1990s.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513209
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The general view is that teenage childbearing will have long-term negative effects on the well-being of the mother-- she may have more difficulty completing high school, which means she may be less likely to pursue postsecondary education and acquire skills for better jobs. Since low-skilled jobs tend to pay less, teenage mothers would have a higher likelihood of living in low income. This study looks at women aged 30 to 39 to determine whether teenage childbearing is related to lower long-term socioeconomic characteristics, with the focus on educational attainment, labour force participation, and living in low income.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800210600
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the 2007 Canadian Community Health Survey, this article profiles Canadian adults who, according to their self-reports, were frequent television viewers and leisure-time computer users.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800110509
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this Juristat is intended to provide a profile of female offenders in Canada. Police-reported data are used to present information on the nature and extent of crime among female youth and adults in 2005 and then examine trends in the rate of female youth and adults charged by police with violent and property offences from 1986 to 2005. Data are compared with crime rates among male youth and adults to illustrate differences in levels and patterns of offending. The report also examines the processing of female youth and adults through the courts and provides characteristics of adult females under federal and provincial/territorial corrections. Again, comparisons are drawn with court activity involving males and with adults males under correctional services.

    Release date: 2008-01-24
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  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the variability of workers' earnings in Canada over the 1982-to-2000 period by a graphical descriptive approach using the Longitudinal Administrative Data base file. Following Gottschalk and Moffitt (1994), we decompose the total variance of workers' earnings into a 'permanent' or long-run component between workers and a 'transitory' or year-to-year earnings instability component over time for given workers. The decomposition is applied to a five-year moving window. Several results are found. First, the general rise in total earnings variance over the period reflects quite different patterns of change for its separate components. Long-run earnings inequality has generally increased over the period, while year-to-year earnings instability has pretty steadily decreased. Changes in the total earnings variability have been driven primarily by changes in long-run earnings inequality. Second, the patterns of change in the two variance components showed substantial differences between men and women. Since the early 1990s, long-run earnings inequality continued to rise for men, but it markedly decreased for women. Since the late 1980s, earnings instability fell quite steadily for women, but it showed a more cyclical pattern for men. Third, the patterns across ages of the two variance components are almost opposite. Long-run earnings inequality generally rises with age, so it is markedly highest among older-age workers. Earnings instability, in contrast, generally declines with age, so it is markedly highest among entry-age workers.

    Release date: 2008-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this bulletin, we document the rural-urban differences in population age structure in terms of: the share of the total population that is senior; the rate of aging of the population in terms of two measures: the growth in the share of the population that is senior and the growth in the number of seniors; the number of communities that are aging by each of these measures; and selected characteristics of the aging communities as compared to communities that are not aging.

    Release date: 2008-12-05

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2008016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Internet's rapid and profound entry into our lives quite understandably makes people wonder how, both individually and collectively, we have been affected by it. When major shifts in technology use occur, utopian and dystopian views of their impact on society often abound, reflecting their disruptiveness and people's concerns. Given its complex uses, the Internet, both as a technology and as an environment, has had both beneficial and deleterious effects. Above all, though, it has had transformative effects.

    Are Canadians becoming more isolated, more reclusive and less integrated in their communities as they use the Internet? Or, are they becoming more participatory and more integrated in their communities? In addition, do these communities still resemble traditional communities, or are they becoming more like social networks than cohesive groups?

    To address these questions, this article organizes, analyzes and presents existing Canadian evidence. It uses survey results and research amassed by Statistics Canada and the Connected Lives project in Toronto to explore the role of the Internet in social engagement and the opportunities it represents for Canadians to be active citizens. It finds that Internet users are at least as socially engaged as non-users. They have large networks and frequent interactions with friends and family, although they tend to spend somewhat less in-person time and, of course, more time online. An appreciable number of Internet users are civically and politically engaged, using the Internet to find out about opportunities and make contact with others.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin updates and summarizes information on the structure and trends for the rural population of Canada, using three major definitions of rural Canada: the "census rural" definition, the "rural and small town" definition and the OECD "predominantly rural region" definition. Each definition illustrates a specific aspect of rural Canada. This analysis is entirely based on data from the Census of Population from 1981 to 2006 (Statistics Canada, 2007).

    Release date: 2008-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800310679
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article presents rates of participation in organized extracurricular activities by Canadian children and youth aged 6 to 17 years, and examines how these rates vary by socio-demographic and socio-economic characteristics. The data are from cycle 4 of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (2000/2001).

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2007006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin presents baseline data on the pattern and size of rural commuting flows in 2001 and provides a better understanding of how rural communities are affected by both urban-bound commuters and rural-bound commuters. It also shows that Canada's Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations (larger urban centres), which are delineated on the basis of commuting flows, essentially constitute self-contained labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110673
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Teenagers are not sitting in front of the television all day, but they are keeping busy at other activities! The General Social Survey (GSS) collected time use data in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Time-use data examines time use over a 24 hour period on a diary day. The analysis in this fact sheet looks at time use by participation rate (number of people reporting an activity) and by the number of minutes spent on an activity. The data show that teenagers aged 15 to 19 were spending less time in front of the television but were spending more time working at a paid job and using the Internet in 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008314
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using the 1983-to-2004 Longitudinal Worker File, this study examines the post-childbirth employment, job mobility and earnings trajectories of Canadian mothers. We found that both the long- and the short-term post-childbirth employment rates of early 2000s cohorts of Canadian mothers were higher than their mid-1980s counterparts, and, relative to childless women, Canadian mothers became less likely to quit over time.

    Our data also allow us to examine the earnings impact of childbirth for a group of Canadian mothers who had strong labour market attachment. For them, earnings dropped by 40% and 30% in the year of childbirth and the year after, respectively. Under both the fixed-effects and the fixed-trend models, the earnings impact of childbirth declined over the other post-childbirth years. Results from the fixed-trend model further suggest that, from the second to the seventh post-childbirth years, the negative effects varied between 8% and 3% and became negligible thereafter.

    Release date: 2008-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The purpose of this research paper was to examine whether the chances of experiencing fear of crime varied across Canadian urban neighbourhoods, and whether factors associated with individuals and their neighbourhoods explained this variation. In addition, the study aimed to understand how Canadians' perceptions of neighbourhood crime and disorder influenced their chances of experiencing fear. Analyses were based on data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization and the 2001 Census. Multilevel regression modelling techniques were employed in order to address the statistical complications that arise when individuals are clustered within larger units such as neighbourhoods. The results showed that while the characteristics and perceptions of individuals were most important in explaining differences in fear among urban Canadians; a statistically significant portion of the variation in fear was attributable to the neighbourhood environment.

    Release date: 2008-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15
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