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  • Articles and reports: 51-004-X2019007
    Description:

    This report presents annual aircraft movements for Canadian airports without NAV CANADA air traffic control towers and NAV CANADA flight service stations.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019002
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of Métis men and women. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as employment rates, employment income, education, occupation and employment types, economic instability, and self-reported mental health.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019003
    Description:

    For Inuit, the term 'livelihood' encompasses work in the wage economy and in the labour that connects them with the land, their culture and their community. The results from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey presented in this paper highlight how important it is to include land-based economy in any examination of the labour market. Furthermore, these findings suggest the need for policies and programs aimed at improving Inuit employment and related economic outcomes.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019004
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of First Nations men and women, including occupation, industry and full-time/part-time employment. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as job satisfaction, skills, health, presence of disability, and measures of economic well-being such as food security.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019010
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines the impact of the Canada–United States border and the potential effects of changing the trade costs it imposes between and within the two countries at a fine geographical scale. The analysis is based on a structural gravity model of trade estimated using Statistics Canada’s Surface Transportation File and the United States Census Bureau’s Commodity Flow Survey. The model estimates the general equilibrium effects that Canada–United States border costs have on trade patterns and welfare, which can be illustrated at a fine regional scale. Maps are used to depict how increases and decreases in border frictions affect not only Canada–United States trade, but also domestic trade flows. The maps show considerable regional variation in both types of trade when conditions at the border change.

    Release date: 2019-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2019003
    Description:

    This paper aims to provide new details on foreign control of corporations in Canada, with a focus on Asia. New details are presented across five industry breakdowns: manufacturing, distributive trade, financial services, resources and mining, and a residual category which includes a composite of all remaining corporate sectors in the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2019-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2019002
    Description:

    Survey data collection through mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones, is underway in Canada. However, little is known about the representativeness of the data collected through these devices. In March 2017, Statistics Canada commissioned survey data collection through the Carrot Rewards Application and included 11 questions on the Carrot Rewards Mobile App Survey (Carrot) drawn from the 2017 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS).

    Release date: 2019-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 51-004-X2019006
    Description:

    This report presents monthly aircraft movements for Canadian airports with NAV CANADA air traffic control towers and NAV CANADA flight service stations.

    Release date: 2019-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100008
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Using data from the 1996 and 2016 Census of Population, this study examines the geographic location of jobs, people’s commute and how they have changed over time. The commuting patterns for Canada’s eight largest census metropolitan areas (CMAs)—Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Calgary, Ottawa–Gatineau, Edmonton, Québec and Winnipeg—are compared.

    Release date: 2019-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2019002
    Description:

    This fact sheet presents forest fire data for British Columbia and discusses various costs and impacts associated with the record area burned in 2018. For example, it covers fire suppression costs, forest fire related greenhouse gas emissions, the Air Quality Health Index, and potentially affected populations, as well as potential impacts on other industries and on ecosystem services.

    Release date: 2019-05-29
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Analysis (5,645)

Analysis (5,645) (0 to 10 of 5,645 results)

  • Articles and reports: 51-004-X2019007
    Description:

    This report presents annual aircraft movements for Canadian airports without NAV CANADA air traffic control towers and NAV CANADA flight service stations.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019002
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of Métis men and women. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as employment rates, employment income, education, occupation and employment types, economic instability, and self-reported mental health.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019003
    Description:

    For Inuit, the term 'livelihood' encompasses work in the wage economy and in the labour that connects them with the land, their culture and their community. The results from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey presented in this paper highlight how important it is to include land-based economy in any examination of the labour market. Furthermore, these findings suggest the need for policies and programs aimed at improving Inuit employment and related economic outcomes.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2019004
    Description:

    This paper uses the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey to assess the employment characteristics of First Nations men and women, including occupation, industry and full-time/part-time employment. A number of other outcomes, influenced by these characteristics, are further explored, such as job satisfaction, skills, health, presence of disability, and measures of economic well-being such as food security.

    Release date: 2019-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019010
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines the impact of the Canada–United States border and the potential effects of changing the trade costs it imposes between and within the two countries at a fine geographical scale. The analysis is based on a structural gravity model of trade estimated using Statistics Canada’s Surface Transportation File and the United States Census Bureau’s Commodity Flow Survey. The model estimates the general equilibrium effects that Canada–United States border costs have on trade patterns and welfare, which can be illustrated at a fine regional scale. Maps are used to depict how increases and decreases in border frictions affect not only Canada–United States trade, but also domestic trade flows. The maps show considerable regional variation in both types of trade when conditions at the border change.

    Release date: 2019-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2019003
    Description:

    This paper aims to provide new details on foreign control of corporations in Canada, with a focus on Asia. New details are presented across five industry breakdowns: manufacturing, distributive trade, financial services, resources and mining, and a residual category which includes a composite of all remaining corporate sectors in the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2019-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2019002
    Description:

    Survey data collection through mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones, is underway in Canada. However, little is known about the representativeness of the data collected through these devices. In March 2017, Statistics Canada commissioned survey data collection through the Carrot Rewards Application and included 11 questions on the Carrot Rewards Mobile App Survey (Carrot) drawn from the 2017 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS).

    Release date: 2019-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 51-004-X2019006
    Description:

    This report presents monthly aircraft movements for Canadian airports with NAV CANADA air traffic control towers and NAV CANADA flight service stations.

    Release date: 2019-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100008
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    Using data from the 1996 and 2016 Census of Population, this study examines the geographic location of jobs, people’s commute and how they have changed over time. The commuting patterns for Canada’s eight largest census metropolitan areas (CMAs)—Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Calgary, Ottawa–Gatineau, Edmonton, Québec and Winnipeg—are compared.

    Release date: 2019-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 16-508-X2019002
    Description:

    This fact sheet presents forest fire data for British Columbia and discusses various costs and impacts associated with the record area burned in 2018. For example, it covers fire suppression costs, forest fire related greenhouse gas emissions, the Air Quality Health Index, and potentially affected populations, as well as potential impacts on other industries and on ecosystem services.

    Release date: 2019-05-29
Reference (47)

Reference (47) (0 to 10 of 47 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1992001
    Description:

    Starting in 1994, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) will follow individuals and families for at least six years, tracking their labour market experiences, changes in income and family circumstances. An initial proposal for the content of SLID, entitled "Content of the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics : Discussion Paper", was distributed in February 1992.

    That paper served as a background document for consultation with and a review by interested users. The content underwent significant change during this process. Based upon the revised content, a large-scale test of SLID will be conducted in February and May 1993.

    The present document outlines the income and wealth content to be tested in May 1993. This document is really a continuation of SLID Research Paper Series 92-01A, which outlines the demographic and labour content used in the January /February 1993 test.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024347
    Description:

    We review the current status of various aspects of the design and analysis of studies where the same units are investigated at several points in time. These studies include longitudinal surveys, and longitudinal analyses of retrospective studies and of administrative or census data. The major focus is the special problems posed by the longitudinal nature of the study. We discuss four of the major components of longitudinal studies in general; namely, Design, Implementation, Evaluation and Analysis. Each of these components requires special considerations when planning a longitudinal study. Some issues relating to the longitudinal nature of the studies are: concepts and definitions, frames, sampling, data collection, nonresponse treatment, imputation, estimation, data validation, data analysis and dissemination. Assuming familiarity with the basic requirements for conducting a cross-sectional survey, we highlight the issues and problems that become apparent for many longitudinal studies.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024348
    Description:

    Gross flows among labour force states are of great importance in understanding labour market dynamics. Observed flows are typically subject to classification errors, which may induce serious bias. In this paper, some of the most common strategies, used to collect longitudinal information about labour force condition are reviewed, jointly with the modelling approaches developed to correct gross flows, when affected by classification errors. A general framework for estimating gross flows is outlined. Examples are given of different model specifications, applied to data collected with different strategies. Specifically, two cases are considered, i.e., gross flows from (i) the U.S. Survey of Income and Program Participation and (ii) the French Labour Force Survey, a yearly survey collecting retrospective monthly information.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024349
    Description:

    Measurement of gross flows in labour force status is an important objective of the continuing labour force surveys carried out by many national statistics agencies. However, it is well known that estimation of these flows can be complicated by nonresponse, measurement errors, sample rotation and complex design effects. Motivated by nonresponse patterns in household-based surveys, this paper focuses on estimation of labour force gross flows, while simultaneously adjusting for nonignorable nonresponse. Previous model-based approaches to gross flows estimation have assumed nonresponse to be an individual-level process. We propose a class of models that allow for nonignorable household-level nonresponse. A simulation study is used to show, that individual-level labour force gross flows estimates from household-based survey data, may be biased and that estimates using household-level models can offer a reduction in this bias.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024350
    Description:

    In longitudinal surveys, simple estimates of change, such as differences of percentages may not always be efficient enough to detect changes of practical relevance, especially in sub-populations. The use of models, which can represent the dependence structure of the longitudinal survey, can help to solve this problem. One of the main characteristics observed by the Swiss Labour Force Survey (SLFS) is the employment status. As the survey is designed as a rotating panel, the data from the SLFS are multivariate categorical data, where a large proportion of the response profiles are missing by design. The multivariate logistic model, introduced by Glonek and McCullagh (1995) as a generalisation of logistic regression, is attractive in this context, since it allows for dependent repeated observations and incomplete response profiles. We show that, using multivariate logistic regression, we can represent the complex dependence structure of the SLFS by a small number of parameters, and obtain more efficient estimates of change.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024351
    Description:

    To calculate price indexes, data on "the same item" (actually a collection of items narrowly defined) must be collected across time periods. The question arises whether such "quasi-longitudinal" data can be modeled in such a way as to shed light on what a price index is. Leading thinkers on price indexes have questioned the feasibility of using statistical modeling at all for characterizing price indexes. This paper suggests a simple state space model of price data, yielding a consumer price index that is given in terms of the parameters of the model.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024352
    Description:

    The National Population Health Survey (NPHS) is one of Statistics Canada's three major longitudinal household surveys providing an extensive coverage of the Canadian population. A panel of approximately 17,000 people are being followed up every two years for up to twenty years. The survey data are used for longitudinal analyses, although an important objective is the production of cross-sectional estimates. Each cycle panel respondents provide detailed health information (H) while, to augment the cross-sectional sample, general socio-demographic and health information (G) are collected from all members of their households. This particular collection strategy presents several observable response patterns for Panel Members after two cycles: GH-GH, GH-G*, GH-**, G*-GH, G*-G* and G*-**, where "*" denotes a missing portion of data. The article presents the methodology developed to deal with these types of longitudinal nonresponse as well as with nonresponse from a cross-sectional perspective. The use of weight adjustments for nonresponse and the creation of adjustment cells for weighting using a CHAID algorithm are discussed.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024353
    Description:

    This paper studies response errors in the Current Population Survey of the U.S. Bureau of the Census and assesses their impact on the unemployment rates published by the Bureau of Labour Statistics. The measurement of these error rates is obtained from reinterview data, using an extension of the Hui and Walter (1980) procedure for the evaluation of diagnostic tests. Unlike prior studies which assumed that the reconciled reinterview yields the true status, the method estimates the error rates in both interviews. Using these estimated error rates, we show that the misclassification in the original survey creates a cyclical effect on the reported estimated unemployment rates. In particular, the degress of underestimation increases when true unemployment is high. As there was insufficient data to distinguish between a model assuming that the misclassification rates are the same throughout the business cycle, and one that allows the error rates to differ in periods of low, moderate and high unemployment, our findings should be regarded as preliminary. Nonetheless, they indicated that the relationship between the models used to assess the accuracy of diagnostic tests, and those measuring misclassification rates of survey data, deserves further study.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024354
    Description:

    This article deals with an attempt to cross-tabulate two categorical variables, which were separately collected from two large independent samples, and jointly collected from one small sample. It was assumed that the large samples have a large set of common variables. The proposed estimation technique can be considered a mix between calibration techniques and statistical matching. Through calibration techniques, it is possible to incorporate the complex designs of the samples in the estimation procedure, to fulfill some consistency requirements between estimates from various sources, and to obtain fairly unbiased estimates for the two-way table. Through the statistical matching techniques, it is possible to incorporate a relatively large set of common variables in the calibration estimation, by means of which the precision of the estimated two-way table can be improved. The estimation technique enables us to gain insight into the bias generally obtained, in estimating the two-way table, by sole use of the large samples. It is shown how the estimation technique can be useful to impute values of the one large sample (donor source) into the other large sample (host source). Although the technique is principally developed for catagorical variables Y and Z, with a minor modification, it is also applicable for continuous variables Y and Z.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024355
    Description:

    Two sampling strategies have been proposed for estimating the finite population total for the most recent occasion, based on the samples selected over two occasions involving varying probability sampling schemes. Attempts have been made to utilize the data collected on a study variable, in the first occasion, as a measure of size and a stratification variable for selection of the matched-sample on the second occasion. Relative efficiencies of the proposed strategies have been compared with suitable alternatives.

    Release date: 1999-01-14
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