Women and Paid Work - ARCHIVED

Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114694

Description:

This chapter of Women in Canada examines women's labour market experiences in comparison to those of men and, where relevant, explores how they have evolved over time. Specifically, historical trends in participation, employment, and unemployment rates are documented. Then, using the most recent data available, employment patterns across a variety of personal and work characteristics are considered: province; educational attainment; marital status; parental status and age of youngest child/ren in the household; lone parenthood; work hours; self-employment; sector of employment (i.e., public or private); "precarious" (i.e., part-time and/or temporary) employment; industry; and occupation. Gender wage differentials are also explored within and between educational and occupational groups. Turning to unemployment, patterns by age, province, and reasons for job leaving/losing are considered, along with Employment Insurance claims and beneficiaries.

Most analyses in this chapter focus on women (and men) in the core working ages of 25 to 54 years, as younger people's (15-24 years) labour market experiences are shaped by school attendance, and older people's (55 years and older) are shaped by retirement. However, gender differences in labour market indicators among youth and mature adults are considered separately at the end.

Issue Number: 2015001
Author(s): Moyser, Melissa
FormatRelease dateMore information
HTMLMarch 8, 2017
  • Correction: March 9, 2017

    A correction was made on March 9, 2017 to the article "Women and Paid Work" in the first paragraph of the sub-section entitled “Employment rate of mothers increases with age of the youngest child.” The employment rate of women with no children under the age of 25 grew by 12.0 percentage points between 1976 and 2015, not 2.0 percentage points as was originally stated.

PDFMarch 8, 2017
  • Correction: March 9, 2017

    A correction was made on March 9, 2017 to the article "Women and Paid Work" in the first paragraph of the sub-section entitled “Employment rate of mothers increases with age of the youngest child.” The employment rate of women with no children under the age of 25 grew by 12.0 percentage points between 1976 and 2015, not 2.0 percentage points as was originally stated.