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Canada's population estimates, first quarter 2019

Released: 2019-06-19

Quarterly population estimate — Canada

37,412,852

April 1, 2019

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.L.

522,537

April 1, 2019

-0.2% decrease

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — P.E.I.

155,318

April 1, 2019

0.4% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.S.

966,858

April 1, 2019

0.2% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.B.

773,020

April 1, 2019

0.1% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Que.

8,452,209

April 1, 2019

0.2% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Ont.

14,490,207

April 1, 2019

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Man.

1,362,789

April 1, 2019

0.2% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Sask.

1,169,131

April 1, 2019

0.1% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Alta.

4,362,503

April 1, 2019

0.4% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — B.C.

5,034,482

April 1, 2019

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Y.T.

40,208

April 1, 2019

-0.4% decrease

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.W.T.

44,420

April 1, 2019

-0.4% decrease

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Nvt.

39,170

April 1, 2019

1.0% increase

(quarterly change)

International migration accounts for more than 80% of the population growth in Canada

During the first three months of 2019, due to a sustained inflow of immigrants, Canada's population increased by 98,410 persons, representing a quarterly population growth of 0.3%. On April 1, 2019, Canada's population was estimated at 37,412,852 persons.

International migration, both permanent and temporary, remained the main driver of Canada's population growth (accounting for 82.8% of all population growth). The rest of the growth (17.2%) was the result of natural increase, or the difference between the number of births and the number of deaths. The downward trend in the share of natural increase is expected to continue. In this context, population growth in Canada will probably rely increasingly on international migration.

The contribution of international migration to Canada's population growth in the first three months of 2019 was driven by an increase in the number of non-permanent residents (+31,547). This was the largest increase for a first quarter since 1989. The increase offset lower permanent immigration numbers in the first quarter. During the first three months of 2019, Canada received 65,959 permanent immigrants, the lowest number for a first quarter since 2015.

Combined with an overall increase in the number of deaths in the population, natural increase in the first quarter (+16,953) continued the downward trend that started decades ago. It should be noted that, because of seasonal factors associated with births and deaths, natural increase is generally lower in the first quarter.

Throughout the country, Nunavut (+1.0%), Alberta and Prince Edward Island (each up 0.4%) had the fastest-growing populations in the first quarter, while Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Newfoundland and Labrador saw their populations decline at a rate varying between -0.2% and -0.4%. In the other provinces and territories, growth was positive and ranged between 0.1% and 0.3%.

  Note to readers

The estimates released today are based on 2016 Census counts adjusted for census net undercoverage and incompletely enumerated Indian reserves, to which are added the population growth estimates for the period from May 10, 2016, to the date of the estimate.

This analysis is based on preliminary data. Since these data will be revised in the coming year, some trends described in this analysis may change as a result of these revisions. Therefore, this analysis should be interpreted with caution.

Canada's population clock (real-time model)

Canada's population clock was updated today with the most recent quarterly population estimates released by Statistics Canada.

Canada's population clock is an interactive learning tool aiming to give Canadians a sense of the pace of the country's population renewal. The population estimates and Census counts remain the measures used by various government programs.

Canada's population clock is available online in the Features section of our website.

Definitions

For the purpose of calculating rates, the denominator is the average population during the period (the average of the start-of-period and end-of-period populations). For the sake of brevity, the terms growth, population growth and population growth rate have the same meaning.

Natural increase is the difference between the number of births and deaths.

Net international migration basically refers to the total number of moves between Canada and abroad that result in a change in the usual place of residence. It is calculated by adding immigrants and net non-permanent residents, then subtracting net emigration. Net emigration distinguishes emigrants, returning emigrants and net temporary emigration.

An immigrant refers to a person who is or has been a landed immigrant (permanent resident) and who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Immigrants are either Canadian citizens by naturalization (the citizenship process) or permanent residents under Canadian legislation. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others have arrived recently. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number are born in Canada. Also, children born in other countries to parents who are Canadian citizens who are temporarily residing in another country are not included in the category as they are Canadian citizens at birth. The terms immigrant, landed immigrant and permanent resident are equivalent.

A non-permanent resident is a person lawfully in Canada on a temporary basis under the authority of a valid document (work permit, study permit, ministerial permit) issued to that person along with members of their family living with them. This group also includes individuals who seek refugee status upon or after their arrival in Canada and remain in the country pending the outcome of processes relative to their claim. Note that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada uses the term temporary resident rather than non-permanent resident. Net non-permanent residents is calculated by subtracting the number of non-permanent residents estimated at the beginning of the period from the number estimated at the end of the period.

Interprovincial migration represents all movement from one province or territory to another involving a change in the usual place of residence.

Products

The Quarterly Demographic Estimates, Vol. 33, no. 1 (Catalogue number91-002-X) publication is now available.

Contact information

For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact us (toll-free 1-800-263-1136; 514-283-8300; STATCAN.infostats-infostats.STATCAN@canada.ca) or Media Relations (613-951-4636; STATCAN.mediahotline-ligneinfomedias.STATCAN@canada.ca).

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