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Canada's population estimates, third quarter 2018

Released: 2018-12-20

Quarterly population estimate — Canada

37,242,571

October 1, 2018

0.5% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.L.

525,073

October 1, 2018

-0.1% decrease

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — P.E.I.

154,750

October 1, 2018

1.0% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.S.

964,693

October 1, 2018

0.5% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.B.

772,238

October 1, 2018

0.2% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Que.

8,421,698

October 1, 2018

0.4% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Ont.

14,411,424

October 1, 2018

0.6% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Man.

1,356,836

October 1, 2018

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Sask.

1,165,903

October 1, 2018

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Alta.

4,330,206

October 1, 2018

0.5% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — B.C.

5,016,322

October 1, 2018

0.5% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Y.T.

40,333

October 1, 2018

-0.4% decrease

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.W.T.

44,445

October 1, 2018

-0.2% decrease

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Nvt.

38,650

October 1, 2018

0.7% increase

(quarterly change)

Canada's population is growing fast

Canada's population was 37,242,571 on October 1, 2018, up 183,715 from July 1, 2018, according to preliminary population estimates. This was the largest increase in number since the beginning of the period covered by the current demographic accounting system in July 1971. The country's population growth rate in the third quarter of 2018 was 0.5%, an increase rarely seen in past quarters.

International migration is the main source of population growth

This growth was largely driven by international migration. In the third quarter, an unprecedented international migratory increase was observed (+146,531), stemming from strong immigration levels and the arrival of a large number of non-permanent residents. International migratory increase takes into account the number of new immigrants admitted to Canada on a permanent basis (+82,316) as well as the increase in non-permanent residents (+79,417), from which net emigration (-15,202) is subtracted. The gain in non-permanent residents was mostly due to an increase in the number of work and study permit holders and, to a lesser extent, an increase in the number of refugee claimants.

Natural increase in the third quarter was estimated at 37,184, or the difference between 103,199 births and 66,015 deaths. Natural increase in the third quarter has been on a downward trend since the third quarter of 2012. In the coming years, natural increase is expected to continue decreasing in Canada, mainly as a result of population aging, which should lead to an increase in the number of deaths.

The population grows everywhere except Newfoundland and Labrador, Yukon and the Northwest Territories

The population grew in nine provinces and one territory in the third quarter of 2018, and declined in Newfoundland and Labrador (-0.1%), Yukon (-0.4%) and the Northwest Territories (-0.2%). Prince Edward Island (+1.0%), Nunavut (+0.7%) and Ontario (+0.6%) had population growth rates above the national level (+0.5%).

The population of British Columbia passed the five-million mark in the third quarter, estimated at 5,016,322 on October 1, 2018.

International migratory increase was the main driver of population growth in every province that posted a population gain.

Nova Scotia, Ontario and Alberta saw gains in their interprovincial migration (movements from one province or territory to another involving a change in the usual place of residence). Ontario had the strongest interprovincial migratory gains (+7,637), followed by Alberta (+3,222) and Nova Scotia (+700). In contrast, British Columbia saw interprovincial migratory losses (-1,217) in the third quarter, following 21 consecutive quarters of gains.

  Note to readers

The estimates released today are based on 2016 Census counts adjusted for census net undercoverage and incompletely enumerated Indian reserves, to which are added the population growth estimates for the period from May 10, 2016, to the date of the estimate.

This analysis is based on preliminary data. Since these data will be revised in the coming year, some trends described in this analysis may change as a result of these revisions. Therefore, this analysis should be interpreted with caution.

Canada's population clock (real-time model)

Canada's population clock was updated today with the most recent quarterly population estimates released by Statistics Canada.

Canada's population clock is an interactive learning tool aiming to give Canadians a sense of the pace of the country's population renewal. The population estimates and Census counts remain the measures used by various government programs.

Canada's population clock is available online in the Features section of our website.

Upcoming releases

Canada's population estimates for the fourth quarter of 2018 will be released on March 21, 2019.

Definitions

For the purpose of calculating rates, the denominator is the average population during the period (the average of the start-of-period and end-of-period populations). For the sake of brevity, the terms growth, population growth and population growth rate have the same meaning.

Natural increase is the difference between the number of births and deaths.

Net international migration basically refers to the total number of moves between Canada and abroad that result in a change in the usual place of residence. It is calculated by adding immigrants and net non-permanent residents, then subtracting net emigration. Net emigration distinguishes emigrants, returning emigrants and net temporary emigration.

An immigrant refers to a person who is or has been a landed immigrant (permanent resident) and who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Immigrants are either Canadian citizens by naturalization (the citizenship process) or permanent residents under Canadian legislation. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others have arrived recently. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number are born in Canada. Also, children born in other countries to parents who are Canadian citizens who are temporarily residing in another country are not included in the category as they are Canadian citizens at birth. The terms immigrant, landed immigrant and permanent resident are equivalent.

A non-permanent resident is a person lawfully in Canada on a temporary basis under the authority of a valid document (work permit, study permit, ministerial permit) issued to that person along with members of their family living with them. This group also includes individuals who seek refugee status upon or after their arrival in Canada and remain in the country pending the outcome of processes relative to their claim. Note that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada uses the term temporary resident rather than non-permanent resident. Net non-permanent residents is calculated by subtracting the number of non-permanent residents estimated at the beginning of the period from the number estimated at the end of the period.

Interprovincial migration represents all movement from one province or territory to another involving a change in the usual place of residence.

Products

The Quarterly Demographic Estimates, Vol. 32, no. 3 (Catalogue number91-002-X) publication is now available.

Contact information

For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact us (toll-free 1-800-263-1136; 514-283-8300; STATCAN.infostats-infostats.STATCAN@canada.ca) or Media Relations (613-951-4636; STATCAN.mediahotline-ligneinfomedias.STATCAN@canada.ca).

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