The Daily
|
 In the news  Indicators  Releases by subject
 Special interest  Release schedule  Information

Canada's population estimates, first quarter 2018

Released: 2018-06-14

Quarterly population estimate — Canada

37,067,011

April 1, 2018

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.L.

525,983

April 1, 2018

-0.3% decrease

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — P.E.I.

153,116

April 1, 2018

0.2% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.S.

958,400

April 1, 2018

0.1% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.B.

761,214

April 1, 2018

0.1% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Que.

8,455,402

April 1, 2018

0.2% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Ont.

14,374,084

April 1, 2018

0.4% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Man.

1,348,809

April 1, 2018

0.1% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Sask.

1,171,240

April 1, 2018

0.1% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Alta.

4,334,025

April 1, 2018

0.4% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — B.C.

4,862,610

April 1, 2018

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Y.T.

38,936

April 1, 2018

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — N.W.T.

44,736

April 1, 2018

0.3% increase

(quarterly change)

Quarterly population estimate — Nvt.

38,456

April 1, 2018

0.7% increase

(quarterly change)

Canada's population passes the 37-million mark

According to preliminary estimates, Canada's population was 37,067,011 on April 1, 2018. It took two years and two months for the Canadian population to go from 36 million to more than 37 million. This was the shortest length of time ever observed for an increase of this magnitude. In the first quarter, Canada's population growth rate was 0.3%, up 103,157 compared with January 1, 2018.

International migration is the main source of population growth

From January 1 to April 1, 2018, international migratory increase was 88,120, the highest level ever for a first quarter. Canada received 79,951 immigrants, while the number of non-permanent residents rose by 22,283. The increase in the number of non-permanent residents was attributable to an increase in the number of work permit holders and refugee claimants.

Natural increase in the first quarter was 15,037, or the difference between 93,944 births and 78,907 deaths. Natural increase reached historic lows according to preliminary data, primarily because Canada had never recorded so many deaths in a single quarter. In addition, there are generally fewer births during this time of the year.

Population grows everywhere except in Newfoundland and Labrador

The population grew in every province and territory in the first quarter, with the exception of Newfoundland and Labrador (-0.3%). Nunavut (+0.7%), Ontario and Alberta (+0.4% each) had higher population growth rates than Canada's (+0.3%). Alberta returned to the positive side in its migratory exchanges with other provinces and territories in the last three quarters, following two consecutive years of losses. The province had interprovincial migration gains of 1,862 in the first three months of the year.

  Note to readers

The estimates released today are based on 2011 Census counts adjusted for census net undercoverage and incompletely enumerated Indian reserves, to which the estimated population growth for the period from May 10, 2011 to the estimate date is added.

These estimates are not to be confused with the 2016 Census population counts that were released on February 8, 2017.

Upcoming releases

Starting with the next release, the population estimates for Canada, the provinces and territories will be based on 2016 Census population counts adjusted for census net undercoverage and incompletely enumerated Indian reserves. Population estimates for the second quarter of 2018 and the annual demographic estimates (from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018) for the total population will be released on September 27. Exceptionally this year, annual demographic estimates (from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018) for the population by sex and age group will be released on December 13.

Definitions

For the purpose of calculating rates, the denominator is the average population during the period (the average of the start-of-period and end-of-period populations). These are quarterly rates. For the sake of brevity, the terms growth, population growth and population growth rate share the same meaning, a quarterly population growth rate.

Natural increase is the difference between the number of births and deaths.

Net international migration basically refers to the total number of moves between Canada and abroad that result in a change in the usual place of residence. It is calculated by adding immigrants, returning emigrants and net non-permanent residents, then subtracting emigrants and net temporary emigration.

An immigrant refers to a person who is or has been a landed immigrant (permanent resident) and who has been granted the right to live in Canada permanently by immigration authorities. Immigrants are either Canadian citizens by naturalization (the citizenship process) or permanent residents under Canadian legislation. Some immigrants have resided in Canada for a number of years, while others have arrived recently. Most immigrants are born outside Canada, but a small number are born in Canada. Also, children born in other countries to parents who are Canadian citizens who are temporarily residing in another country are not included in the category as they are Canadian citizens at birth. The terms immigrant, landed immigrant and permanent resident are equivalent.

A non-permanent resident is a person lawfully in Canada on a temporary basis under the authority of a valid document (work permit, study permit, ministerial permit or refugee card) issued for that person along with members of their family living with them. This group also includes individuals who seek refugee status upon or after their arrival in Canada and remain in the country pending the outcome of processes relative to their claim. Note that Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada uses the term temporary resident rather than non-permanent resident.

Products

The Quarterly Demographic Estimates, Vol. 32, no. 1 (Catalogue number91-002-X) publication is now available.

Contact information

For more information, or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact us (toll-free 1-800-263-1136; 514-283-8300; STATCAN.infostats-infostats.STATCAN@canada.ca) or Media Relations (613-951-4636; STATCAN.mediahotline-ligneinfomedias.STATCAN@canada.ca).

Date modified: