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Chart 1 
Literacy proficiency levels of 25- to 64-year-olds, 2012

Nunavut Northwest Territories Newfoundland and Labrador Quebec Saskatchewan New Brunswick British Columbia Manitoba Canada OECD Alberta Nova Scotia Ontario Prince Edward island Yukon¹ 0 20 40 60 80 100 % Level 0/1Level 0/1 Level 2Level 2 Level 3Level 3 Level 4/5Level 4/5
1.
Level 0/1 data are not available for Yukon, as they are too unreliable to be published.
Note(s):
Percentages may not add up to 100 as a result of rounding. Literacy was measured on a continuous scale ranging from 0 to 500 and can be reported as the distribution of the population across five proficiency levels from 1 to 5 with an additional category, 'below level 1.' Level 1 corresponds to respondents displaying the lowest level of ability. Levels 4 and 5 were combined to include those with the highest level of ability.
Source(s):
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD); Statistics Canada, Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective, 2014 (Catalogue number81-604-X).

Chart description

The title of the graph is "Literacy proficiency levels of 25- to 64-year-olds, 2012."
This is a bar stacked chart.
The horizontal axis is "%."
The title of series 1 is "Level 0/1."
The title of series 2 is "Level 2."
The title of series 3 is "Level 3."
The title of series 4 is "Level 4/5."

Literacy proficiency levels of 25- to 64-year-olds, 2012, %
  Level 0/1 Level 2 Level 3 Level 4/5
Nunavut 52 28 15 4
Northwest Territories 31 31 27 11
Newfoundland and Labrador 21 36 32 10
Quebec 20 34 34 12
Saskatchewan 18 31 39 12
New Brunswick 17 34 37 11
British Columbia 17 29 37 16
Manitoba 17 31 37 15
Canada 17 32 37 14
OECD 16 34 38 12
Alberta 16 29 39 16
Nova Scotia 16 33 36 15
Ontario 15 32 38 15
Prince Edward island 14 31 40 15
Yukon¹ F 26 41 18
1.
Level 0/1 data are not available for Yukon, as they are too unreliable to be published.
Note(s):
Percentages may not add up to 100 as a result of rounding. Literacy was measured on a continuous scale ranging from 0 to 500 and can be reported as the distribution of the population across five proficiency levels from 1 to 5 with an additional category, 'below level 1.' Level 1 corresponds to respondents displaying the lowest level of ability. Levels 4 and 5 were combined to include those with the highest level of ability.
Source(s):
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD); Statistics Canada, Education Indicators in Canada: An International Perspective, 2014 (81-604-X).
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